HUMAN RIGHTS FOR EACH PERSON REGARDLESS OF AGE, RACE, RELIGION OR POLITICS
HOME | PRISONERS & PRISONS | EXPERIENCES | BOOKS & PRODUCTS | HOW YOU CAN HELP | LATEST NEWS | EMAIL
LATEST NEWS

Peter Lloyd charged with three new offences in Singapore

Article from: Herald Sun


More charges: ABC journalist Peter Lloyd was grim faced in court today as he faced new charges. He is pictured here as he leaves his lawyer's office in Singapore yesterday. Picture: Kian-Yan Law
SENIOR ABC reporter Peter Lloyd has been charged with three new offences at a Singaporean court today.

It is understood one of the charges relates to the consumption of the drug ice, and the other two relate to the possession of drug paraphernalia.

It is also believed the original two offences have been changed slightly.

The exact detail of the charges was not immediately known, but outside the court the foreign correspondent appeared upset as he hugged family and friends.

Outside the court, surrounded by a large media pack, Lloyd declined to comment but Lloyd's lawyer Tan Jee Ming said the new charges were "comparatively not that serious''.

In Singapore's Subordinates Court a judge extended Lloyd's bail despite the new offences and adjourned the case for one week.

The prosecutor did not seek any additional bail conditions and Mr Ming said his client was already on the equivalent of $45,000 assurety.

The new charges take to the total numer of offences Lloyd faces under Singaporean law to five.

He is accused of trafficking and possession of methamphetamines.

ABC journalist faces more charges after drug bust

ABC journalist Peter Lloyd arrives at the subordinate courts in Singapore. Photo: AP


Three new drug charges laid against ABC journalist Peter Lloyd in Singapore include one count of possessing utensils that carried traces of the veterinary drug ketamine.

Nicknamed Special K, ketamine is also a recreational drug used for its psychedelic or hallucinogenic effects.

The other two new charges against Lloyd are methamphetamine consumption without authorisation, and possessing utensils that carried traces of methamphetamine, a charge sheet shows.

The consumption charge carries a maximum penalty of 10 years in jail or a $S20,000 ($A15,400) fine, or both.

The other two charges each have a maximum penalty of three years in jail or a $S10,000 ($A7,700) fine or both.

Lloyd was grim-faced as he appeared today before the Singapore Subordinates Court on charges of possessing and trafficking the drug ice.

During a brief hearing the court heard that the three additional charges had been laid against Lloyd, who was already facing allegations which could land him in jail for up to 20 years, or earn him up to 15 strokes of the cane.

Outside court defence lawyer Tan Jee Ming confirmed three additional charges had been laid, but would not immediately reveal what they were. The new charges were not read out in court.

The lawyer said he wanted more time to study the new charges before commenting but, asked how serious they were, said: "Comparatively, not that serious.''

Lloyd, 41, wearing a blue and white checked shirt and black pants, said nothing as he stood before the judge, who extended his bail before adjourning the case for a week.

The New Delhi-based foreign correspondent was released on bail on Wednesday after being arrested last week while on leave in Singapore.

He was initially charged with trafficking about one gram of methamphetamine to a Singaporean for 100 Singapore dollars ($75) at a hotel early this month.

He was also charged with allegedly being in possession of about one gram of ice.

AAP

Accused reporter Peter Lloyd steps out in public
By Lisa Davies in Singapore - July 25, 2008 - Article from: Herald Sun


'A broken man' ... Journalist Peter Lloyd / Picture: Channel 10
SHUFFLING down a dim wooden staircase towards a Singapore street yesterday, ABC journalist Peter Lloyd looked a broken man.

In his first appearance in public since his arrest last week, there was no evidence of the ebullient on-air persona that Aunty's viewers know so well.

In its place was the bleak stare of a man mired in uncertainty.

The 41-year-old, who is accused of possessing and supplying the drug ice, stared with empty eyes that betrayed no emotion as he emerged into the stifling tropical heat.

He carefully walked the few metres to a hire car, seemingly oblivious to the waiting cameras and the questions from his media colleagues.

If he had answers, he was not going to reveal them.

Looking gaunt and tired, the pressure of the past week was etched on his face.

His clothes and casual shoes resembled the crumpled attire of a backpacker rather than an experienced reporter at the peak of his career.

In his first appearance in public since his arrest last week, Lloyd was only in front of the cameras for a matter of seconds, but his stare remained constant and focused.

As one of the ABC's most respected foreign correspondents, with years of reporting in Asia and the Middle East, he knows only too well the seriousness of his predicament.

Speaking for Lloyd was his close friend and ABC colleague Tim Palmer, who flew to the city-state last weekend to do what he could to help.

Palmer said Lloyd was thankful to his supporters and had no complaints about how Singaporean authorities had handled the matter.

Part of Lloyd's original reason for his trip to Singapore was to have treatment for an eye infection and his health had improved, Palmer said.

Lloyd's legal fight would begin in earnest, he said.

The battle will undoubtedly be made even tougher by what is being held at stake: his career, his physical wellbeing and his freedom.

Lloyd faces a maximum of 20 years in jail and 15 strokes of the cane if convicted.

Nowhere in sight yesterday was friend and confidant Mohamed Mazlee bin abdul Malik, a Singaporean who posted $34,500 bail on Wednesday.

At Mr Malik's plush condominium complex - where Lloyd is required to live as a condition of his bail - neighbours said no one was home.

However, remaining close by was ABC news boss John Cameron who, despite telling reporters earlier in the day that he was leaving and had no further role in Lloyd's defence, was present at the journalist's legal conference.

Lloyd will face the Subordinates Court again today.

CLICK HERE TO RETURN TO THE NEWS PAGE
FREEDOM IS A RIGHT OF ALL HUMAN BEINGS IN A WORLD WHERE LIFE IS VALUED AND PEACE MAY FINALLY BE A POSSIBILITY
*
MAKE A DONATION
*
TELL A FRIEND
*
HOME | PRISONERS & PRISONS | EXPERIENCES | BOOKS & PRODUCTS | HOW YOU CAN HELP | LATEST NEWS | EMAIL
Just in case you forgot - read the Universal declaration of Human Rights
Copyright - An important message to website owners:
All information at this site is Copyright 1996 - 2008 'Save-A-Life' , 'Foreign Prisoner Support Service' & 'ForeignPrisoners.com' unless stated otherwise. As with all our information AND more specifically, information relating to CAMPAIGNS AND/OR PRISONERS we have been granted special permission to disclose this type of information by the families and/or by the detainee themselves. Therefore, if you wish to use any of this information to re-create in your own website or elsewhere, please contact us - save breach of copyright. News stories are reprinted for archival, news reporting and information use only and are credit where possible.
Click here for the legal stuff